Cecil Beaton

Sir Cecil Beaton is a renowned English fashion photographer who became an award winning costume designer in the 1920s-30s for stage & film productions. He was known for his portrait photographs of many famous people of the 20th century.

In the 1920s he was hired as a staff photographer for Vanity Fair & Vogue where he earned renown for his unique style of posing sitters with unusual backgrounds. He published his first collection of works in 1930 with ‘The Book of Beauty’. He was tapped to photograph the wedding of the Duke of Windsor & Wallis Warfield in 1937 as well as Queen Elizabeth’s coronation in 1953.

Beaton also recorder the fighting in England, Africa & the Middle East for the British Ministry of Information during WWII. His famous photo of a hospitalised 3 year old air raid victim Eileen Dunne graced the cover of Life magazine. After the war he resumed shooting photos of the rich & famous as well as nurturing his passion for costume & set design.

He is renowned for his images of elegance, glamour & style. His influence on portrait photography was profound & lives on today in the work of many contemporary photographers such as David Bailey & Mario Testino. His enduring portraits of the famous names of the 20th century are a unique legacy & historic record.

He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1972.

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1 thought on “Cecil Beaton”

  1. Cecil really Captures the emotion in his subjects eyes aswell as the elegancy of what ever fashion he may be capturing. I didn’t know he was knighted though! thats pretty cool.

    Like

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