Ben Brown

Ben Brown is a Sydney bassed Illustrator. Ben has created posters for high profile musicians such as Nirvana, Silverchair and Fat Boy Slim to drawing Stab magazine’s regular cartoon, Ben Brown has a genuine and varied love for the illustrated form. The Sydney-based illustrator has been on the art scene for over twenty years, drawing from his enthusiasm for surfing, skate culture and music to get involved in projects which he’s passionate about.

He’s been responsible for the visual identities for popular local festival such as Falls Festival, Big Day Out and Good Vibrations, has illustratred two children’s books and has been involved in merchandise design for surf brands Rip Curl, Hot Buttered and others. Somehow he also finds time to feature his illustrations in international magazines such as Rolling Stone, Juice, Waves, Mad and other publications. Whew!

‘’I have always enjoyed drawing and doodling since I was young – so it was kind of a natural progression. In my adolescent years I hung around a lot of noisy bands and stinky pubs and I soon found myself doing posters, flyers and record covers for all manner of bands, promoters and record companies. An interest in surfing and skateboarding similarly lead to work with surf and skate companies and magazines.’’ Ben Brown. I am inspired by the ways Ben uses bright vibrant colours to contrast his very detailed line work.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

Geoff McFetridge

Geoff Mcfetridge is a Canadian filmmaker, graphic designer and illustrator based in Los Angeles California. The artist was educated at the Alberta College of the Art as and the California Institute of the Arts.

The artists uses a simple palate of greys, blues, white and pinks within his paintings he tends not to use lines instead, uses tone to create definition.

He places his subjects in humorous and everyday scenarios. His paintings are developed from simple geometric shapes and flat two dimensional planes of colour so that they resemble advertisements, signs, maps, and other designed elements from the urban environment.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

http://geoffmcfetridge.tumblr.com

https://www.artsy.net/artist/geoff-mcfetridge

alphonse mucha

Alphonse Mucha; born in 24 July 1860 in the town of Ivančice Moraviawas a Art Nouveau illustrator who is well known due to his unique style.. he has produced many artworks, illustratins, advertisements, postcards, and designs. His singing abilities kept him in the high school of Moravian capital of Brünn (now known as Brno), even though his true passion was art.

 

HTpl0hW.jpgjob-1896.jpgAlfons_Mucha_-_1896_-_Winter.jpgAlfons_Mucha_-_F._Champenois_Imprimeur-Éditeur.jpg

his works are interesting because they mix classicalism with a somewhat contemporary touch, his works are very easily distinguishable as his own due to his apparent style.

eBoy

The work of the eBoy group perfectly captures the quote by Blake As an illustrator you need to understand the human body – but having looked at and understood nature, you must develop an ability to look away and capture the balance between what you’ve seen and what you imagine.” There use of pixels to create human figures shows there ability to understand the human body and then capture the delicate balance between what they see and what they imagine.

The eBoy group was founded in 1997 by Kai Vermehr, Steffen Sauerteig and Svend Smital and began working with pixels as they believed it gave them the ability to making pictures only for the screen. They also say It’s the best way to get a really sharp and clean looking results and that handling pixels is fun and you are forced to simplify and abstract things, which is a big advantage of this technique.

This technique of abstracting and simplifying things shows that they have the ability to see past every day objects and to again find the balance between the real world and what they imagine. This can be see in their work with theirunique ability to create realistic facial feature using only pixels. There work on city scapes also shows this ability and how they can turn almost anything into a re creation using only pixels.

The work of Kai, Steffen and Svend at eBoy show there unique ability to see past what is put in front of them and to create art work that is a mixture of the real world and their imaginations. It is for this reason that there work does perfectly capture the quote of Blake.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EBoy

http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/category/everything/

http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/

http://www.theverge.com/2014/6/17/5803850/pixel-perfect-the-story-of-eboy

\http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/2017/02/06/webradio-wv/

http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/2016/11/10/home-gym/

Jean Phillipe Delhomme

As an illustrator you need to understand the human body – but having looked at and understood nature, you must develop an ability to look away and capture the balance between what you’ve seen and what you imagine.

Jean Phillipe, a French born Fashion illustrator 1959, who has done work with animated commercials, and even created his own children book called Visit to Another Planet, as well as two fully illustrated novels.

I think he does it very well with his balance of colours tones and contrasts, he uses lots of organic strokes and solid colours with a mixture of different pallets


above: Jean-Philippe and his portrait series of Karl Lagerfeld in Whitewall magazine. Karl himself was said to love the work.


Even his sketches portray  balance with nothing but coloured pencil lines.


Above: A Barneys New York poster..
http://www.jphdelhomme.com/advertising/ljwf0f5on47wene2rx6rxy51xnwme5

https://unknownhipster.com
http://blog.jedroot.com/jri/2009/12/new-illustrator-jeanphilippe-delhomme.html

Yuko Shimizu

“As an illustrator you need to understand the human body – but having looked at and understood nature, you must develop an ability to look away and capture the balance between what you’ve seen and what you imagine.”

Illustrators not only have to have an understanding of the human anatomy but they need to be very creative with their own illustrative style. An illustrator’s unique style is what makes them stand out from the crowd. One such illustrator is Yuko Shimizu.

Yuko Shimizu is a Japanese Illustrator based in New York City & instructor art the school of Visual Arts. Her style is surreal & combines the language of Japanese woodblock prints with the grammar of graphic novels as well as comic book culture.

She has contributed to magazines such as ‘Rolling Stone’ & the ‘New York Times’ & has been included in ‘Newsweek Japan’s’ ‘100 Japanese People the World Respects’

“I think there are two types of illustrators, and two types of creatives in general. Either do something you are told to do or create something only you can give them.” – Yuko Shimizu

“I think in illustration, you have to start with a certain style, even if it’s not as concrete as it will be 10 years later on. There are a gazillion people who can draw and illustrate; you really have to stand out to get work” – Yuko Shimizu

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Geoff Mcfetridge

“As an illustrator you need to understand the human body – but having looked at and understood nature, you must develop an ability to look away and capture the balance between what you’ve seen and what you imagine.”

Geoff McFetride is an artist and designer based in Los Angeles California. Born in Canada, Geoff attended Alberta College Of Art and the California Institute of the Arts. Geoff won public acclaim when he was still a student winning awards from the Art Directors Club and International Design Magazine for his thesis project Chinatown.

For two years he was an art director for the underground beastie boys magazine Grand Royal. He then went onto starting up a design studio Champion Graphics which has produced projects for numerous clients such as Nike, Pepsi, Stussy, Burton Snowboards, Girl Skateboards, and Patagonia.

Beginning with drawings he composes his paintings from simple geometric shapes and flat two-dimensional planes of color, so that they resemble advertisements, signs, maps, and other designed elements. Working in a simple palette of grays, blues, whites, and pinks, he places his subjects in humorous and everyday scenarios. He creates graphic images in fine lines, bold colors, repetition, perspective, and simplicity. His work gives the viewer the sense of figuring out a puzzle that doesn’t have one answer.

As stated from ‘books.google’ “Few people better exemplify the lack of boundaries in todays design world than Geoff McFetridge. An artist and graphic designer, animator, filmmaker, and all-around visual auteur.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

https://www.artsy.net/artist/geoff-mcfetridge

http://geoffmcfetridge.tumblr.com

http://joshualinergallery.com/artists/geoff_mcfetridge/

https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Bohemian_Modern.html?id=N5Ih3my_S_4C